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This blog is meant to allow Fragment-based Drug Design Practitioners to get together and discuss NON-CONFIDENTIAL issues regarding fragments.

Most recent posts

Compound purification can be a major hassle: separating the desired product from starting materials, reagents, and byproducts often takes far longer than making the compound in the first place. As weve previously noted, this is especially true for small, polar...
Earlier this year we highlighted a paper from Novartis in which ligand deconstruction was used to deconstruct an HTS hit against the epigenetic target methyltransferase polychrome repressive complex 2 (PRC2). In a new J. Med. Chem.paper, Ying Huang and Novartis...
Sir James Black famously said that the best way to find a new drug is to start with an existing one. A drug not only has to bind to a target with reasonable affinity, it also has to survive an onslaught of metabolic insults and avoid doing too much collateral...

Most popular posts

Last year we highlighted work out of Ben Cravatts group at Scripps on screening covalent fragments in cells. Now, in a new Cell paper, his group and collaborators at the cole Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and the Salk Institute...
Teddys retirement from the blog has cut down on the numberof PAINS-shaming posts, and truth be told there are so many candidate papers that they could easily swamp fragments, which I suspect would drive away most of the readership. That said, I did want to...
Weve written previously about irreversible covalent fragment-based lead discovery. The nice thing about irreversible inhibitors is that they have an infinite off-rate: once they bind and react with a target, that protein is permanently out of action. A paper...

Latest posts linking here

I’ve very much been enjoying this paper, on fragment-based chemogenomics in whole cells. That’s the sort of blurb, I admit, that’s probably going to make you immediately want to read the rest of the paper, or immediately go do something else...
I really enjoyed reading this article in J. Med. Chem. on curcumin. (Update: here’s the take over at Practical Fragments). That’s a well-known natural product, found in large quantities in turmeric root (which is where most of the yellow color comes...
What happens when you expose a reactive, covalent-bond-forming compound to cell extracts (or to living cells)? The answer is complicated. You might expect the compound to go around grabbing every reactive group it sees, shotgunning across the proteins it encounters...