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This blog is meant to allow Fragment-based Drug Design Practitioners to get together and discuss NON-CONFIDENTIAL issues regarding fragments.

Most recent posts

The kinase CK2 is an intriguing anti-cancer target, but most of the reported inhibitors bind in the conserved hinge region and so also hit other kinases, complicating interpretation of the biology. A team based at the University of Cambridge has taken a fragment-linking...
Chirality underpins all life. Nineteen of the twenty amino acids contain at least one stereocenter, as do all nucelosides, sugars, and most metabolites. The very first fragment I ever found was chiral, but that is not typical, at least judged by those that...
What do you do when you find a fragment? After checking for artifacts and getting as much structural information as possible, the next step is usually to test analogs for improved potency. But how do you go about that? Richard Hall and his colleagues at Astex...

Most popular posts

Last year we highlighted work out of Ben Cravatts group at Scripps on screening covalent fragments in cells. Now, in a new Cell paper, his group and collaborators at the cole Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and the Salk Institute...
Teddys retirement from the blog has cut down on the numberof PAINS-shaming posts, and truth be told there are so many candidate papers that they could easily swamp fragments, which I suspect would drive away most of the readership. That said, I did want to...
Weve written previously about irreversible covalent fragment-based lead discovery. The nice thing about irreversible inhibitors is that they have an infinite off-rate: once they bind and react with a target, that protein is permanently out of action. A paper...

Latest posts linking here

I’ve very much been enjoying this paper, on fragment-based chemogenomics in whole cells. That’s the sort of blurb, I admit, that’s probably going to make you immediately want to read the rest of the paper, or immediately go do something else...
I really enjoyed reading this article in J. Med. Chem. on curcumin. (Update: here’s the take over at Practical Fragments). That’s a well-known natural product, found in large quantities in turmeric root (which is where most of the yellow color comes...
What happens when you expose a reactive, covalent-bond-forming compound to cell extracts (or to living cells)? The answer is complicated. You might expect the compound to go around grabbing every reactive group it sees, shotgunning across the proteins it encounters...